15 Types Of Crabapple Trees You Can Grow In Your Yard

One of the best aspects of gardening is choosing the perfect tree to complete your backyard. You can pick a tree to create shade for summertime picnics, to serve as a focal point for your garden, or to create a natural fence between you and your neighbors or the street. While not every plant has to be functional, you still want something pleasing to the eye and complementary to the rest of your garden. 

A crabapple tree (Malus sylvestris) serves that very purpose. Gardenia notes that when shopping for different types of crabapple trees for your yard, you might want to consider some qualities such as the color of the blossoms, fruit, and leaves. You also might want to research the tree's height and some factors regarding its care, such as the amount of sun exposure needed and the soil type for planting. So without further ado, we bring you a variety of crabapple trees for your next landscaping project. 

1. Adirondack crabapple tree

This type of crabapple tree, known as the Adirondack (Malus Adirondack), gives you both fruit and flowers. According to Better Homes and Gardens, it grows lovely white blossoms in the spring, and fruit in the fall and early winter. Its narrow spread and sizable height make it ideal for a large yard.

Bloom Season: Mid-spring

USDA Growing Zone: 4 through 8

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Loam, clay, sand, neutral

Size: Up to 18 feet

2. Coralburst crabapple tree

The Coralburst (Malus coralcole) grows slowly up to its 10-foot height, making it a great option for your yard. J. Frank Schmidt & Son Co. notes that the rose-colored blossoms give rise to bronze-toned fruit, which offers a pleasing contrast to its dark green foliage. This type of crabapple tree needs moderate watering and full exposure to the sun for optimal tree health (via Monrovia).

Bloom Season: Spring

USDA Growing Zone: 3 through 8

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Any type; well-drained/regular watering

Size: 15 feet

3. White cascade crabapple tree

The White Cascade crabapple tree (Malus cascole) makes an excellent choice for an ornamental, weeping tree. According to Backyard Gardener, its white blossoms appear in late spring, which grow into small, yellow fruit. This crabapple tree needs partial to full sun to thrive. When you first plant it, you'll need to create a small "moat" around it for watering. As it matures, it should need regular watering.

Bloom Season: Mid to late spring

USDA Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Growing Conditions: Partial to full sun

Soil Type: Sand and clay

Size: 12 feet

4. Indian magic crabapple tree

The Indian magic crabapple tree (Malus × 'Indian Magic') gives you an ornamental option for your yard with its deep pink, almost violet blossoms, and vibrantly red fruit. The green foliage turns a lovely shade of red in the fall, as noted by the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. With a slightly rounded shape and branches that reach upward, this tree will compliment your landscape throughout the year.

Bloom Season: Mid-spring

USDA Growing Zone: 1 through 10; 14 through 21

Growing Conditions: Full sun; drought tolerant

Soil Type: Clay, chalk, loam, sand; well-draining

Size: Up to 15 feet

5. Lollipop crabapple tree

This type of crabapple tree, known as the Lollipop (Malus lollizam), gives you a great alternative to topiaries or plain, green shrubs, according to plant brand Proven Winners. With its short height and naturally curved and compact shape, the Lollipop crabapple tree makes an ideal addition to a small garden or a corner of the patio. In addition to the green leaves and white blossoms, you'll also gain some pleasing red fruit.

Bloom Season: Spring

USDA Growing Zone: 4 through 8

Growing Conditions: Full sun for at least 6 hours

Soil Type: Acidic soil that's kept moist but well-drained

Size: Up to 8 feet

6. Adams crabapple tree

According to SF Gate, the Adams crabapple tree (Malus adams) offers eye-catching appeal during all seasons. The bright pink blossoms make way for the shiny, red fruit surrounded by greenish, reddish foliage. This type of crabapple tree proves to be one of the taller varieties, so a late winter pruning keeps its broad reach in check.

Bloom Season: Spring

USDA Growing Zone: 4 through 8

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Acidic loam soil

Size: Up to 20 feet

7. Pink princess crabapple tree

The Pink Princess crabapple tree (Malus parrsi) is a shorter form of the Sargent whose trademark is its red leaves, according to Missouri Botanical Garden. Its deep red fruit also adds to this tree's charm, while its horizontal spread makes it useful for a small hedge or a corner piece in the yard. Better yet, this variety also tolerates dry weather quite well.

Bloom Season: Late spring

USDA Growing Zone: 5 through 9

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Moist, loamy, acidic soil

Size: 8 feet

8. Pink Sargent crabapple

Like its Pink Princess counterpart, the Sargent (Malus sargentii) tends to be shorter than most trees, as noted by Chicago Botanical Garden. Also, you can count on many shades of red throughout the year –- from red buds in early spring to red fruit in early fall. Between those seasons, you can look forward to pink or white blossoms and deep green foliage that does well with minimal pruning.

Bloom Season: Late spring to early summer

USDA Growing Zone: 4 through 8

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Moderate

Size: 8 feet

9. Cinderella dwarf crabapple tree

The Cinderella dwarf (Malus cinzam) gives you a low-maintenance option that you can place in a small garden, either in a corner or as the focal point. Monrovia advises maintaining the soil's moisture by surrounding the tree with mulch. Once you have your tree established, watering once a week would suffice.

Bloom Season: Middle of spring

USDA Growing Zone: 4 through 9

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Slightly acidic soil with a pH of no higher than 6.5

Size: Up to 8 feet

10. Velvet pillar crabapple tree

Whether you call it the Roseybloom or the Velvet Pillar (Malus 'Velvet Pillar'), this type of crabapple tree gives distinctive beauty and lots of shade to large spaces. With a column-like trunk and branches that grow upward as opposed to spreading, you'll only have to prune it once during the winter for the tree to keep its majestic shape, as per Gertens Garden Center. Best of all, the lovely, pointed leaves turn a shade of dark red, and you can look forward to red fruit in the fall.

Bloom Season: Mid-spring

USDA Growing Zone: 4

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Any type as long as it stays moist

Size: Up to 20 feet

11. Centennial crabapple tree

The Centennial crabapple tree (Malus centennial) bears a reddish-orange fruit that's perfect for preserving. You can make everything from jelly to apple butter to spices from the apples, according to ProGardenTips. As you go into the fall, you'll also enjoy the leaves' golden hues, adding a splash of clothing to your garden. 

Bloom Season: May

USDA Growing Zone: 3 through 9

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Loamy

Size: 8 to 15 feet

12. Hoppa crabapple tree

The words "tough" and "beautiful" both describe the Hoppa crabapple tree (Malus hopa), thanks to its fragrant pink blossoms and semi-weeping branches, per Luv2Garden. Furthermore, you'll enjoy dark scarlet fruit that's tasty right off the branch or as canned preserves. The one consideration to keep in mind is that you'll need to prune this variety to keep it at a manageable height.

Bloom Season: Mid to late spring

USDA Growing Zone:4 through 8

Growing Conditions: Can tolerate partial sun; full sun exposure provides the best results

Soil Type: Clay and sand

Size: Up to 25 feet

13. Whitney crabapple tree

The Whitney crabapple tree (Malus pumila) produces red and yellow fruit that is ideal for cooking and making cider. As noted in One Green World, this crabapple tree offers you a great ornamental option even if you live in a climate with cold winters and hot summers.

Bloom Season: April

USDA Growing Zone: 2

Growing Conditions: Full sun for at least half the day

Soil Type: Loamy; well-drained

Size: 10 to 16 feet

14. Pink spires flowering crabapple tree

The Pink Spires variety (Malus hybrid) possesses a colorful combination of dark purple and red leaves with two-toned pink blossoms in the spring. With maroon-colored fruit in the fall and a tall and oval shape, My Garden Life recommends this tree as your yard's focal point. It will add an attractive pop of color.

Bloom Season: Early spring

USDA Growing Zone: 5 through 8

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Well-drained

Size: 15 feet

15. Red jewel crabapple tree

The Red Jewel (Malus x 'Red Jewel') would be quite a gem in your yard. The small tree has bright, white blossoms that develop into eye-catching red fruit, as per the University of Florida Extension. The size and shape of this variety make it ideal for a corner of a small space, or you can plant a tree at each end of a walkway leading up to your home's entrance.

Bloom Season: Spring

USDA Growing Zone: 4A Through 8A

Growing Conditions: Full sun

Soil Type: Well-drained; loamy

Size: Up to 15 feet